The Bearer of Great Power

When my siblings and I were kids, our parents bought a plot of land about 30 miles outside the city where we lived and began building their dream home. They drove back and forth every weekend checking on various things and in the summer they went several times during the week.

For us kids, the drive was interminable. To pass the time, we used to peer at all the cars that drove parallel to us and create stories about the people inside. Those of us not creating the story asked questions. What kind of house did they live in? Did they have pets? What kind of pets? Where did they work? What was their job? Did they have kids?

All of this based on a few moments in a passing lane. We never had any way of knowing how close or far off the mark we were. Certainly our saying it about them had no effect on their actual lives whatsoever. But, would it have if they had heard us? I can hear you saying “Of course not!”

Sometimes we overhear people talking about us. They talk about our lives and what they are, could be or should be. Or what they clearly are not or may never be.

Sometimes we absorb those words like parched earth in a rainstorm—whether they’re true or not. That’s fine if they’re saying great things about us. When they think we have a bright future, or say how brilliant we’re going to be. Even if they don’t know us.

But what if they say not-so-great things?

Our words bear great power.

In Mattithyahu 21:18-21 we find this example:

The next morning, on his way back to the city, he [Yeshua] felt hungry.  Spotting a fig tree by the road, he went up to it but found nothing on it except leaves. So he said to it, “May you never again bear fruit!” and immediately the fig tree dried up.  The talmidim [apostles] saw this and were amazed. But why did the tree whither? The passage continues and tells us exactly in verse 21: if you have trust and don’t doubt.

The definition of trust is to “believe in the reliability, truth, ability, or strength of.” A tree does not trust or not trust and yet it reacted. We have the ability to discern. We can choose our words. Check out this video.

We may never know how many brilliant people are not living up to their full potential because they took to heart the words of the wrong person. And maybe you are one of them.

So what does this mean for you?

No one can predict the future. Why would we ever allow anyone to predict a negative outcome for our lives? And why on earth would we ever agree with them?

When someone speaks negatively over you, even if they just don’t like your ideas, how do you feel? It might surprise you you don’t have to accept those words. A lady I know says aloud, “I do not receive that.” If that’s in appropriate (more than someone speaking negatively over you!) you can always whisper it under your breath. The important thing is to acknowledge, that you do not trust or believe in those words.

When a person who encourages you speaks what is your reaction? Do you believe them? Why or why not?

You have the ability to be a world changer with your words—even in your own life.  As a young child, I said something my father didn’t like. He let me know it by uttering a string of words that haunted me for years and always nipped at my self-confidence. I was reminded of this again recently, and I turned it around and made it a positive affirmation. This proved to be life-changing for me.

So if you hear negatives in your head, reframe them!

You might be reading this and realize that you are the deliverer of negative words.

You still have the potential to be a world changer with your words for the positive—if you become aware of your words and change them. One of my relatives started out saying negative things as a joke, and as an effort as self-deprecating humor. Over time, it became their habit to be sarcastic. Being aware of your thoughts and words is the first step toward becoming a more positive minded individual. Not only will your life change, but the lives surrounding you may begin to bloom. I encourage to try it for 90-days and see what changes you notice. Then comment below with your discoveries.

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